steampunktendencies:

House of Scientists, Lviv, Ukraine (by lukasz mlodzinski)

steampunktendencies:

House of Scientists, Lviv, Ukraine (by lukasz mlodzinski)

kobetyrant:

wolverhempten:

kobetyrant:

OPINIONS CAN BE RACIST

OPINIONS CAN BE SEXIST

OPINIONS CAN BE HOMOPHOBIC

stop using “it’s just my opinion” to justify your bigotry.

ITS NOT BIGOTRY UNTIL YOU’RE RUDE ABOUT IT

what’s a nice way to be racist, homophobic, and/or sexist? please enlighten me

steampunktendencies:

Jellyfish Air Plants (PetitBeast)

Do you have anything for gaslamp fantasy? (:
Anonymous

characterandwritinghelp:

Gaslamp fantasy, steampunk’s magical cousin! (As I understand it,) gaslamp fantasy is an intersection of historical fiction and fantasy, which means a lot of your research and worldbuilding will come with a few filters, including but not limited to:

  • What’s your time period?
  • What are your fantasy/science rules and intersections?
  • How does the fantasy factor into the world?

Gaslamp fantasy is heavier on fantasy than on history, which leaves you largely free to develop at will. That said, let’s look at the above.

  • What’s your time period? Do some research solely on the basis of history to get a feel for the time period—figure out the dress code, social norms, how far medicine has advanced, what they do for fun, how relationships begin and end, etc.
  • What are your fantasy/science rules and intersections? This is where we get into the fantasy side of it. As with any historical/real world blending with fantasy, you need to figure out how magic and science play together—if they play at all. What are some failings/shortcomings of science that fantasy can fill? Are there places magic cannot get to or things magic is unable to deal with that science can and will? Do they ever overlap to create a blended magic/science technological element?
  • How does the fantasy factor into the world? Science aside, now. Fantasy is probably going to be the bigger “half” of your story influences, so consider how the fantastic elements affect the world. Where does magic come from? What is it? Who learns and uses it? Are there magical/supernatural creatures in the world?

Check also:

-Headless

royalwatcher:

The many jewels and amour once belonging to the one of the most powerful empires in the world, the Ottoman Empire on display at the Topkapi Palace. [x]

archiemcphee:

Awesome Anamorphic Artwork isn’t restricted to walls, floors and sketchbooks. There’s a whole amazing subset that, instead of having the viewer stand in just the right spot, requires looking at flat image or sculpture reflected in a cylindrical mirror in order to see it properly.

Last month the folks at Bored Panda assembled a fascinating collection of 23 examples of this mind-bending art form. Here you see pieces by István Orosz, Jonty Hurwitz, Vera Bugatti and Awtar Singh Virdi respectively.

Click here to view the entire post.

[via Bored Panda]

halloweencrafts:

Death and Graveyard Symbolism Infographic. For more Halloween infographics go here.

This infographic briefly covers symbols for:

  • Death
  • Death Personified
  • Colors of Death in Different Cultures
  • Gravestones
  • Afterlife 
  • Religious Symbols

archiemcphee:

Letters are full of awesome potential. Combine enough of them and you’ve got a declaration of love, a sidesplitting joke, a life-saving message in a bottle, a precious secret, a poem, a novel or a Broadway play. Swiss visual artist and graphic designer Cyril Voilloz manipulates letters in a much different fashion. He treats them as visual playthings that can be poked to squirt ink, peeled from their paper, pulled and twisted from a sketchbook onto a computer screen or opened to reveal their internal components. It’s typography that teases 2D letters into 3D objects and we love it.

Visit Cyril Voilloz’s website or follow him on Instagram to check out lots more of his awesome artwork.

[via Visual News]

fashionsfromhistory:

Four Poster Bed (Himmelbett)

1812

Ausserrhoden, Appenzell, Switzerland

Philadelphia Museum of Art